aninounettear:

Who run the world? Prince Wu!

OH MY DAYSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS LMAOOO 

who clocked this needs a trophy lmaooo

(via thebeyhive)

yagazieemezi:

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. “It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be.”

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself." (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

wachsein:

Keith Haring painting Grace Jones, 1984. Photograph by Andy Warhol.
source: the Red List

wachsein:

Keith Haring painting Grace Jones, 1984. Photograph by Andy Warhol.

source: the Red List

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

Janelle Monáe's Womanist and Afrofuturist Trilogy of Songs

gradientlair:

One of my favorite observations about Janelle Monáe’s art and messages is by way of three particular songs of hers on three different albums. Listen to “Many Moons” then “Cold War” then “Sally Ride” by Janelle Monáe, in succession. It is genius and an experience. Her albums Metropolis (Suite I -…

artblackafrica:

Pascale Marthine Tayou (Cameroon), Tug of War, 2013

(via beautiesofafrique)

everestless:

Africa | Fulani (Peule) women photographed in Cameroon | © Alessia de Marco

everestless:

Africa | Fulani (Peule) women photographed in Cameroon | © Alessia de Marco

(via beautiesofafrique)

Most Vulnerable Nigerians: The Legacy of the Asaba Massacres

(Source: nigerianostalgia, via nigerianostalgia)

dynamicafrica:

Fela Kuti - Lady

If you call am woman African woman no go ‘gree

She go say, she go say, “I be lady, oh”

She go say, “I be lady, oh”

She go say, “I be lady”

She go say, “I no be woman”

She go say, “Market woman na woman”

She go say, “I be lady”

(Source: rasdivine, via nigerianostalgia)

nigerianostalgia:

Monday’s Girls explores the conflict between modern individualism and traditional communities in today’s Africa through the eyes of two young Waikiriki women from the Niger delta. Although both come from leading families in the same large island town, Florence looks at the iria women’s initiation ceremony as an honor, while Azikiwe, who has lived in the city for ten years, sees it as an indignity. Ngozi Onwurah, director of such feminist classics as Coffee Coloured Children and Body Beautiful, herself an Anglo-Nigerian, turns a wry but sympathetic eye on the cross-cultural confusions.

The five week long iria ritual is overseen by post-menopausal women headed by the redoubtable Monday Moses (hence the title.) The girls are paraded bare-breasted before the entire community so their nipples can be examined to determine whether they are still virgins. They are then confined to the “fattening rooms,” their legs immobilized in copper impala rings, where they are pampered and fed. Finally, the girls, now women, are presented to society, wearing yards of fabric around their waists indicating each family’s wealth - and suggesting pregnancy.

The film traces the girls’ contrasting responses to each stage of the ritual. Florence, who is Monday’s granddaughter, comments at the end of the ceremony, “I’m not fat, but I am grown up now,” but even she decides to postpone marriage until she completes her education. Azikiwe refuses to bare her breasts and, as a result, her father is fined by the outraged villagers and she is sent back to the city in disgrace. She concludes: “There are some traditions people should forget.”

(Source: newsreel.org, via beautiesofafrique)

blackfashion:

wearing a Tai and Amali piece
Mfon, 20, Lagos, Nigeria

blackfashion:

wearing a Tai and Amali piece

Mfon, 20, Lagos, Nigeria

dynamicafrica:

Pharrell’s GQ Masai-inspired Cover Sparks Outrage From Masai Community.

The British have a terrible history when it comes to cultural sensitivity. Looking at this world map, one can see that the vastness of the once-British Empire is not a display of greatness, but rather the markings of a former global system of oppression of brutality that has left its mark on our world today. Whilst far from the level of British imperialism, Pharrell Williams’ happy-go-lucky self doesn’t have an outstanding track record when it comes to cultural appropriation either. Perhaps that’s why this pairing featuring British GQ and Pharrell Williams isn’t altogether shocking.

Earlier this year, the singer, rapper, producer and ‘New Black’ spokesperson swapped his Vivienne Westwood mountie hat for a Native American war bonnet as he posed on the cover of Elle UK. How he and the entire Elle UK Magazine crew have managed to miss the countless articles and posts that have been published and circulated widely online against this form of cultural appropriation, I have no clue. But it seems like neither camp was aware, cared or showed any concern about their offensive actions until they were lambasted on social media.

Prior to the shoot, the Elle UK Magazine’s website posted a description of the editorial saying, “We persuaded Elle Style Award winner Pharrell to trade his Vivienne Westwood mountie hat for a Native American feather headdress in his best ever shoot.” Post-criticism, the message was later changed to read, “We persuaded [Pharrell] … to collaborate with us on his best ever shoot.” This weak attempts at a “cover-up”, if you can call it that, shows that Elle didn’t quite got the message. Not only were they fully aware of what Pharrell Williams was wearing from the get-go (they referred to the item by name), they neglected to concern themselves with the significance behind the item. Rather odd as fashion magazines are notorious for publishing well-researched in-depth articles about the designers behind the clothing featured in their magazines - especially on their covers.

Posing in yet another Western fashion-related magazine, this time British GQ, Pharrell’s multi-page spread sees him wearing arbitrary face paint and items of clothing associated with Masai people. Shot by lens duo Hunter & Gatti, the two said about the shoot, “all the inspiration concept of the shoot is related to the Masai tribe paintings. We brought a real Masai tribe just to make the ambient music around the shoot and inspire Pharrell.” If you’re wondering what this ‘tribe’ looked like or what the so-called ‘ambient music’ sounded like, GQ posted a video of the behind-the-scenes action on YouTube. But what’s really frightening in this case isn’t their overuse of the word ‘tribe’, it’s how they refer to the Masai people and culture as nothing more than items and props to be used at their disposal exposing the ways cultural appropriation rids a people of agency. That and how this cover makes Pharrell a repeat offender and serial cultural appropriator.

Whilst there has been outrage from members of both the Masai community and people leaving comments on Kenyan blogs concerning the commercial use of their culture, it is yet to receive the attention it deserves in mainstream media making a formal apology less likely in this case. What’s more, the specific use of Masai culture as a source of ‘inspiration’ speaks to the greater problem of companies that have been profiting from the image of the Masai, an already marginalized group in their home country, for decades.

In a BBC interview, Lemayian Ole kereto, an elder from the Masai community, expresses some key concerns with regards to the case against appropriation. Not only is cultural appropriation an act of suppression done primarily for commercial gain and usually enacted on already oppressed and marginalized groups, the use of “culture without consent” is never complimentary as it disregards the history, traditions and identities of those it depicts and affects the most. Ole kereto further adds that without prior consent from those representing the communities or culture in question, use of any facet of their culture falls directly into the real of cultural appropriation. If no body or agency exists that represents the majority or totality of the people in question, then companies should then refrain from this form of cultural ‘borrowing”. Ownership must be respected at all times.

Often, when discussing the issue of cultural appropriation, the question of whether or not it can be complimentary or not is sure to arise. The answer, quite simply, is no. Cultural appropriation has no benefits to those it affects. Cultural sensitivity and awareness are at the crux of addressing issues pertaining to cultural appropriation. When buying or making use of an item that is said to represent or belongs to a certain community, it is important to inform oneself of who is benefiting from this transaction. There is a possibility that cultural “borrowing” can benefit all parties involved. As Ole kereto says, “partnership attracts responsibility” which in turn creates effective awareness beyond commercial gain and profitability.

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In all the Western media craze over the young Pakistani activist Malala, there is a key point ignored about her: She is not only a Muslim feminist, she is a socialist with Marxist tendencies. In her own words: “I am convinced Socialism is the only answer and I urge all comrades to take this struggle to a victorious conclusion. Only this will free us from the chains of bigotry and exploitation.”

i will return home to five graves
with a foreign accent
i will kneel and greet each of them
waiting for them to bless me
i will return home to five graves
sitting where i was once
just a little girl
i will imagine her dancing to welcome me
offering me roasted yam and peppered palm oil
i will remember their smiles
she will remember me
even with my foreign accent
she will still speak Igbo
but
i will return home to five graves
to ancestors who held me as a baby
telling me who i was once in my former life
but
i will return home to five graves
with a foreign accent
where Obianuju means
she came in abundance
i will return home
as half eaten love poems
never a foreigner
always the daughter of her people.

Ijeoma Umebinyuo (via theijeoma)

My heart she just put to lyrics my life

(via beautiesofafrique)

cultureunseen:

Selected images by Pieter Hugo

http://www.pieterhugo.com/

(via beautiesofafrique)

organicsomethings:

accrawalkintours:
Brazilian graffiti artist Alexandre Keto is currently in Ghana as part of his Africa tour. He’s together with another Ghanaian graffiti artist Moh Fsc Awudu working on some amazing projects in Accra. These are some of the stuff they’ve done so far.    

(via bornofthelivingsun)